Editorial #6 Witch/Craft

Witchcraft. Crafting is embedded in witchery, part of the practice of magic. From crafty or cunning crones to charms and casting spells; from spinning, traditions, rituals, weaving, to herbs, botanics and potions – craft, creation, myth and mystery all surround the occult. Witchcraft is intimately linked with ‘women’s work’ and the domestic arts – in […]

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Anne Jackson: The Witchcraft Series

My current body of work examines witch trials and witch-persecution, in European history, and as a metaphorical lens through which to explore some of the fears and prejudices of our own time.  I know that the absolute truth of past events is inaccessible. All I am doing is reflecting my own fantasies, attitudes and prejudices, […]

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Jane Fairhurst: Wands, Fetishes for Uncertain Times & Women's Work

Art and Ethnography Jane’s approach to the production of art that refers to ancient or other cultures comes from an intention to firstly understand something of those cultures and this she does through reading. Sourcing books and information in various outlets including the internet, those books in turn referencing further reading, thus she gathers information […]

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‘The Event of a Thread’: a recap of Weave It! an exhibition curated by Decorating Dissidence

‘Something speaks to us, a sound, a touch, hardness or softness, it catches us and asks us to be formed’ – Anni Albers, ‘Material as Metaphor’ (1982) 2019 marked the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Bauhaus, an experimental German art school that sought to reimagine the role of art and design in everyday […]

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Pioneers in Peckham: Bauhaus Legacies in London

Amongst the latest in Bauhaus Centenary exhibition offerings comes RIBA’s ‘Beyond Bauhaus: Modernism in Britain, 1933-66’, an innovative installation of archival materials arranged inside temporary columns with geometric peep-holes cut at varying heights. Anchored in the 1930s, the exhibition presents a rich survey of avant-gardism in British architecture and design, augmented by international trends and […]

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The Chairs of Chandigarh…

In 1922, ‘Bauhaus in Calcutta‘ saw artists travel from Germany to India to exhibit work and sketches alongside modern Indian artists like Nandalal Bose and Sunayani Devi. In conversation with the Visva-Bharati school, founded by poet, musician and artist Rabindranath Tagore, it came at a time when Indian artists were seeking a modernist language outside […]

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Spotlight: Tatiana Bilbao

This year will see Mexican architect Tatiana Bilbao begin her design for an aquarium in Mazatlán. But this is ‘not a zoo for fish‘. Instead, Bilbao’s studio will work within the Brutalist structures to create an eco-friendly, sustainable research centre that seeks to enrich its surroundings. We chose to spotlight Bilbao’s work in this Bauhaus special […]

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sweepRANT by Sarah Cameron

I don’t want to sweep the floor any moreI don’t want to sweep the floor anymoreI must have swept it 10 times todayI don’t want to sweep the floor anymore. It’s dull, monotonous, dreary, drabirksome, humdrum, nut-dummin’ banal.I havna nothing ‘gainst sweeping per seI quite like it actually;but to do it quite as much as […]

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Spotlight: Blandine Martin, ‘Objets sans importance’

Our spotlight this month is the mixed-media artist Blandine Martin. Martin works with materials including sand, recycled paper and timber to combine the organic with the abstract. Looking at objects and their place within the domestic sphere, Martin questions and transforms everyday objects, their assumed function and associated rituals, particularly rituals involving women. Objets sans […]

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Navigating Cultural Liminality: Private Rooms by Ghada Amer

Offering a critique of imperialist thought, Edward Said’s Orientalism created a paradigmatic shift in understanding the relationship between Western (Occidental) and non-Western (Oriental) cultures. Yet Orientalism still pervades mainstream representations of non-Western cultures, which oscillate between intense fetishization and demonization, often in almost the same breath. See for example Dalia Dawood’s description of the Aladdin […]

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