Teaching Historians with Tools: Toward a Subversive Pedagogy 

What if we could tell a different story, Seth C. Bruggeman asks. What if we looked for inspiration in craft and cognitive science and object theory? What if we could write a history of labor and embodied knowledge that shows how skill itself is a survival strategy, one that we all share because it is literally built into each of our bodies?

Teaching Historians with Tools: Toward a Subversive Pedagogy 

On Tool Embodiment

Jeff Peachey asks: What really goes on in an embodied state? Could it be reconstructed, or at least some the complexities described retrospectively? Here are some of the decisions and actions that become take place during the embodied activity of paring leather…

On Tool Embodiment

Editorial #14: Craft, Teaching, and Knowledge

by guest editor Kate Devine

How is it that we come to know something or more particularly, how to do something? We may imbibe the words of others, learn by watching a skilled example, learn through our own trial and error, or discover something within ourselves. How then, do we pass on that knowledge? Through stories, through instruction, through play? It can be hard to teach something ‘you just know’. 

Editorial #14: Craft, Teaching, and Knowledge

Family, Community, and Inheritance in the Quilt-Making of Gee’s Bend

With a population today of just 275 people, Gee’s Bend is a small, isolated hamlet with a complex history. Surrounded on three sides by the Alabama river, it was once a cotton plantation, originally established by Joseph Gee and then later owned by Mark Pettway. As direct descendants of the slaves and subsequent sharecroppers who worked on the land throughout the 19th and 20th Century, the majority of those who live in Gee’s Bend continue to share the Pettway name.[1]

Family, Community, and Inheritance in the Quilt-Making of Gee’s Bend